pattern

Here is the abstract of my last publication in International Journal of Architectural Computing. It was a long study of Parquet Deformation for me, partially archived in this blog; Parquet Deformation is an architectural studio exercise introduced by William Huff in 1960s. It aims to improve students’ reasoning of spatiotemporal variation by utilizing sequential shapeshifting of patterns. This article examines the outcomes of this educational research from a perspective of design computing with a purpose to remark its pedagogical significance. A multilayered reading about the exercise will reveal its historical, theoretical, and artistic backgrounds. Then […]

Berfin Sanem Top Beste Tekdoğan Kerem Yücel Utkan Kanberoğlu Summer School at IBU opened the course Architectural Geometry this year. Here is one of the exercises I tested with a few students. This is about creating Escher-like patterns for an introductory topic on the designerly utilization of those “boring” regular tessellations. Square, hexagon or triangular tessellations are used as underlying structures of more seemingly-complex patterns.

This exercise was a popular one in 2015 and 2016 Architectural Geometry classes. Recently, I found these images of student works. However some of the students’ names are missing (please e-mail me if one of them is yours). I love this exercise because it is a quick and efficient way of explaining and experimenting the workflow of digital to physical production. In this particular exercise students created Rhino Macro codes to develop these 3d pattern deformations. It is a flexible exercise system with lots of options for an instructor.

This quick project was a mapping of a tiling pattern inside of a multi-storey residential building’s hallways. While drawing the construction documents, it was necessary to apply of some coding here, as each floor had a different shape to be tiled. First, I’ve imported the geometric boundaries and the “middle curves” of the designed tiling pattern. The design was a simple one, yet to be handled carefully. After solving an example like this one, the Grasshopper definition generated all tiling solutions for the remaining hallways very quickly, saving lots of time. Sorry for the spaghetti code here, […]

Again, seamless patterns are one of the main exercises of this semester’s architectural geometry class. It is expected to improve students reasoning on generative patterning while they explain their processes step by step. In between the random decision makings and the consciousness about the process, here are some of the student works: Sıla Yılmaz Seda Kasa Kaan Hiçyılmaz Göktuğ Balıkçı

Inspired from this cut-fold pattern, we developed a prototype with Fulya Akipek. First experiments were made from 3mm thick foamboards and they worked very well with 50×70 plates. However when the project gets bigger and bigger, we needed to add a joint detail and use 5mm thick foamboards to achieve our goal (that is to develop a 1m by 2.5m shutter system). Then, we tried to animate its folding behavior by adding an arduino setting with one motion sensor and a standard 11kg-cm torque continuous servo. This was another prototype we’ve introduced […]

Here is a good brief explanation by Mark Garcia on how patterns re-emerged in the digital age after Modernism and Postmodernism. …In the 1980s and 1990s, Postmodernist patterns predominated, and especially those of Robert Venturi, Rem Koolhaas, Stan Allen and Sanford Kwinter (fields), along with historicist, folding, sprawl, cross-programming, high-density/proximity, non-places and other Deconstructivist and high-tech patterns. In 1992, Henri Lefebvre’s last book Rhythmanalysis: Space, Time and Everyday Life was published. Because Lefebvre’s keystone concept of ‘rhythm’ is identical to ‘pattern’, it stands (together with Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s […]

While preparing the Geometry yearbook, I picked these four patterns from the 4th week assignment, “Seamless Patterns”. I still love to see how these patterns are generated by students with very limited knowledge on computer and geometry. There are other posts about this assignment here and here. Below are four from this semester; Ceren Atik Zeynep Dutipek Ceren Atik Meltem Bayrak

Unlike classical Pattern Deformation assignment discussed here and here, this time we asked students to explore deformations by using referential systems as a secondary space. They are expected to create variations on a regular pattern only by deforming its underpinning lattice. Below are three examples of this alternative assignment. I’m thinking about improving this exercise to three dimensions, seems very easy to implement by using cage editing commands of Rhino. Selin Işıldar Serra Uludağ Mine Güvenç

Here is a phrase from Deleuze’s famous article “Difference and Repetition”. It clarifies my mind while thinking about patterns, boundaries, rules and most imporatantly, the idea and techniques of deformation in contemporary architectural geometry. … On the other hand, generality belongs to the order of laws. However, law determines only the resemblance of the subjects ruled by it, along with their equivalence to terms which it designates. Far from grounding repetition, law shows, rather, how repetition would remain impossible for pure subjects of law – particulars. It condemns them to […]

Below are some student works of this years Architectural Geometry / Pattern Deformations assignment. Students developed their own pattern deformation sequences mostly on regular hyperframes. Based on the classical Parquet Deformation exercise (discussed here), we tried to implement a rule-based approach in order to explore emergent patterns. The exercise seem to reveal endless improvisation potentials. Ece Erdoğdu İdil Side Erdoğan Bengisu Aydos Görkem Ünsal Mısra Sonat Göz Zehra Böhürler

In the third day of Architectural Geometry class, we’ve discussed about the regular tessellations, the famous triangle, hexagon and square tiles. Homework was to develop a custom referential system based on regular tessellations. We used popular explications of Islamic Patterns as inspirational examples, however we developed our own reference systems and patterns. Başak Konuşur Ceren Sezgin Ece Erdoğdu Görkem Ünsal Hüseyin Kuşçuoğlu Irmak Aşıkoğlu Zehra Böhürler Zeynep Dutipek

One at the Center is a multiple-axes vertex deformation based on a quadrangular hyperframe, designed by David Oleson at the studio of William Huff in 1964. Below, you see the original drawing and my Grasshopper animation based on a single point attractor, creating the “one” whereever it is. It was a pleasure to read and repeat this deformation, which is a nice exercise of data tree operations and also one of the first examples I see about point attractor algorithms in design education. Here is the Grasshopper file; if you are interested; [GHX: […]

This is a bitmap reading exercise in Grasshopper. After Firefly, it became much easier to define inputs other than number sliders, but bitmap component was always an alternative. Here is the Grasshopper definition that creates predefined holes on a surface based on an image file: [GHX: 0.9.0056] This will be built as a building facade; I’m very curious about the final look, I’ll post the photos of the building when it is finished. The VB component manages the decisions regarding the grayscale value and circle radii. Edit: Here is the result of […]

Crossover is a single-axis, line-based deformation algorithm, constructed on a regular quadrangular hyperframe, designed by Richard Lane at the Basic Design studio of William Huff in 1963. It presents two apparently different deformation sequences linked together. Designer created a transition between the borders and inner cross-shapes gradually. This transition is visually smooth and interesting because of the component shift in the middle. It actually does not include polygonal components as seen at first sight, but works with a sequence of point and line orientations instead. This liberation from traditional understanding […]

New version of Grasshopper brings out two important features: Patch surfaces and date/time components. We used to implement a VB component to create simple clocks that measure temporal operations in Grasshopper. Parsing and executing MusicXML’s and related applications were based on that (here, here and here for example). Now I see there is a whole component tab, dealing with time-based issues in Grasshopper. I’m glad much more could be done in real-time now. Second and more important component was the special surface construction method of Rhinoceros, patch command is now […]

Below is a nice brief explanation of the concept “pattern” in architecture. In fact, this old issue of AD still covers many aspects of contemporary conception and use of patterns in designing. I advise everyone in this field to take a look at this journal. The etymology of ‘pattern’ is from the Latin pater, or patronus, meaning father, patron, god or master, from which is derived the notion of pattern as a model, example, matrix, stencil or mould. The contemporary concept of pattern is as a sequence, distribution, structure or progression, a […]

Trifoliolate is a single-axis, single-prototile hexagonal deformation designed by Glen Paris at the studio of William Huff in 1966. Dataflow diagram of the prototile is defined by first implementing a “manual” Euclidean construction of ruler and compass, then this applied to Grasshopper using a curve evaluation method (which is much optimal). This dependency graph reveals parametric potentials of the tiling. After that, a gradial manipulation is added to the tiling in order to create the original parquet deformation. Finally, further deformation opportunities are experimented on the tiling. Dataflow modeling is based […]

After explaining the beautiful parquet deformations of William Huff, Douglas Hofstadter states his opinions about algorithmic potentials of those patterns. Although it was 30 years ago, Hofstadter points out a fundamental discussion related with today’s parametric design tools; …for a machine to make simple variants of a given design, it must possess an algorithm for making that design which has explicit parameters; those parameters are then modifiable, as with the pseudo-Mondrian paintings. But the way people make variations is quite different. They look at some creation by an artist (or […]

I finally installed Firefly, it immediately powers Grasshopper up with beautifully smart components, even if you don’t have ardunio it is still very useful. If you want to give it a try, first you have to install a small tool free from www.reactivision.com in order to send data to Firefly. After that, you may download and install firefly from their website, www.fireflyexperiments.com. It was the real-time inputs, my first interest. I was very excited to get data from my laptop’s tiny webcam and process that data to deform a pattern. […]

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