parquet deformation

2013_11_17-patdefI-th

Below are some student works of this years Architectural Geometry / Pattern Deformations assignment. Students developed their own pattern deformation sequences mostly on regular hyperframes. Based on the classical Parquet Deformation exercise (discussed here), we tried to implement a rule-based approach in order to explore emergent patterns. The exercise seem to reveal endless improvisation potentials. Ece Erdoğdu İdil Side Erdoğan Bengisu Aydos Görkem Ünsal Mısra Sonat Göz Zehra Böhürler

2013_08_26-oneatthecenter-th

One at the Center is a multiple-axes vertex deformation based on a quadrangular hyperframe, designed by David Oleson at the studio of William Huff in 1964. Below, you see the original drawing and my Grasshopper animation based on a single point attractor, creating the “one” whereever it is. It was a pleasure to read and repeat this deformation, which is a nice exercise of data tree operations and also one of the first examples I see about point attractor algorithms in design education. Here is the Grasshopper file; if you are interested; [GHX: […]

2013_08_20-crossover-th

Crossover is a single-axis, line-based deformation algorithm, constructed on a regular quadrangular hyperframe, designed by Richard Lane at the Basic Design studio of William Huff in 1963. It presents two apparently different deformation sequences linked together. Designer created a transition between the borders and inner cross-shapes gradually. This transition is visually smooth and interesting because of the component shift in the middle. It actually does not include polygonal components as seen at first sight, but works with a sequence of point and line orientations instead. This liberation from traditional understanding […]

2013_04_30-trifoliolate-th

Trifoliolate is a single-axis, single-prototile hexagonal deformation designed by Glen Paris at the studio of William Huff in 1966. Dataflow diagram of the prototile is defined by first implementing a “manual” Euclidean construction of ruler and compass, then this applied to Grasshopper using a curve evaluation method (which is much optimal). This dependency graph reveals parametric potentials of the tiling. After that, a gradial manipulation is added to the tiling in order to create the original parquet deformation. Finally, further deformation opportunities are experimented on the tiling. Dataflow modeling is based […]

2013_01_29-grin-th

The series of workshops named as “gridal infection”, or “infections” in short, explore multiplicity of pattern deformation as a pedagogical context. It aims to encourage design students to manage an associative process of design, composed of short-term constructive assignments. Students are expected to develop an understanding on the contemporary computational design techniques regarding a connection between abstraction and conceptualization. It reflects an open discussion to the abstract types and methods of potential infections on any pre-defined system while geometric representation of a such infection would be the design of a unique […]

2013_01_29-firefly-th

I finally installed Firefly, it immediately powers Grasshopper up with beautifully smart components, even if you don’t have ardunio it is still very useful. If you want to give it a try, first you have to install a small tool free from www.reactivision.com in order to send data to Firefly. After that, you may download and install firefly from their website, www.fireflyexperiments.com. It was the real-time inputs, my first interest. I was very excited to get data from my laptop’s tiny webcam and process that data to deform a pattern. […]

2013_01_27-parq-def

This was a challenge; “is it possible to model a two-way parquet deformation using only native components, limited to 10 of them only”. Parquet deformations is a very interesting and pedagogical topic to teach some of the basics of contemporary parametric modeling. However it is an old technique; but looking at the architectural academia I think it is an underestimated one. The graph input tool creates the magic here. If you change the type of graph you’ll see a sort of it’s representation over a simple pattern deformation based on […]

2012_10_31-parquet

This is not to explain the method, but to see the potentials. After we’ve studied regular, semi-regular, dual and truncated tessellations with students, Architectural Geometry course is now expecting them to develop a pattern deformation such as these shown below. These samples are taken from this website if you are also interested in other topics of tessellation. They can all be drawn with simple commands, line, control point editing, trim, extend, and rotate. Their firing rule is so simple that maybe they don’t need a complex algorithms to model such structures. […]

2012_02_03-star1-th

This is a starting point of pattern generation study in a dataflow environment. Based on Hankin’s method of Islamic Pattern generations, I tried to simulate his process beginning with a basic regular tiling (regular hexagonal tessellation). This and other methods are explained in phD thesis of Craig S. Kaplan (here) Grasshopper definition can be downloaded here: [GHX file:0.8.0063] This approach is especially good at deformations from various attractors (without breaking linear stability). Further research should include other generation methods such as the rule-based approach that, at first sight seems to […]