loop

2015_04_17-sedtree-th

This is a classical method of generating tree-like forms utilizing a simple command “Arc SED”. The idea is simple, as the command draws arcs using an input direction vector, so this could easily be implemented creating “smooth” composition of curves just by iteration. Actually, this has been a previous study, discussed before here, using Hoopsnake. Now, this time I’m implementing the same algorithm using Anemone and a couple of other changes.   Here is the Grasshopper definition (Anemone Components should be installed first): [GHX: 0.9.0076].

2015_04_11-binary-th

Based on this post, the problem of modeling tree-like fractal shapes is still a good question for early years of computational design education. Last time, I used Rhino’s macro to study these kind of fractals in an “impossibly” limited interface, but this time both vb.net and Anemone are introduced to students. First, using a Vb.net component that creates “the binary tree”: Here is the Grasshopper definition if you would like to see the simple vb.net loop in there: [GHX: 0.9.0076] (Don’t left click on the link, right click and “save the file” to your computer). Then, […]

2015_04_09-iceray-anemone-th

Further studying iteration in Grasshopper, this time, inspired by Stiny’s “Ice-Ray”ish subdivisions with Aneome, instead of Hoopsnake in the previous work. Here is the Grasshopper definition (Requires Anemone components to be installed first): [GHX: 0.9.0076] Of course this is just an inspiration not the real scientific study Stiny has conducted (although I receive lots of emails about the previous Hoopsnake implementation; guys I’m not sure if this kind of algorithms are suitable for academic studies). Anyway this definition chooses random splitting directions of a surface for every iteration.

2015_01_02-thelix-th

This is the Grasshopper definition that generates tetrahedral helix (also called as Boerdijk-Coxeter helix), but in a funny way. This geometry is also a solution for tangent spheres. I generated the helix using Anemone components for recursion and gave it a little bit of responsiveness. I don’t know if it depends on the speed of your CPU but if it is slow enough, you’ll see the snake game of tetrahedral helix as it is driven by your input from a control knob. I’m not that interested in phone apps nowadays but […]

2014_05_05-loopleaf-th

While testing Anemone loop components for Grasshopper, these curves have emerged. In fact, I was trying to develop the definition that mimics the well known branching script with “Arch SED” method (using tangent vectors for each arc and iterating the process in a random fashion so that the branches (arcs) join nicely). Anyway, this definition develops one branch from every previous one, while the position, rotation and the length are defined by three seperate graphs. If you play with these graphs, you’ll see the Anemone updates itself automatically, finally collecting the […]

2012_01_19-text-th

In 30th eCAADe Conference, there was a very interesting paper by Gabriel Wurzer and Burak Pak, titled: “Lawnmower”, that explains a research on an educational tool. However, their survey tells us some of the fundamental issues of dataflow programming paradigm for designers. Here is a quote from them; …A further point not connected with the graphical representation is that of lacking comprehensibility of data flow (and therefore the call for step-by-step debugging). Data in Grasshopper is mostly exchanged via lists containing geometrical objects. These lists are used as a replacement for loops, in the following manner: […]

2012_03_14-tree-th

The method used here is inspired from a topic at the Rhino Python 101 Primer. This is a funny method on the recursive operation that creates tree-like shapes composed of arcs. These arcs are constructed by using Arc SED method, that requires start and end points and a vector that is tangent to the arc (at the start point). Therefore, overall look of a chain of these constructions create a smooth look, as all of ths arcs are tangent to previous ones. However, such constructions cannot be simulated (or at […]

2012_02_05-iceray-th

Design of Chinese lattices, used in windows and doors especially in 19th century, called in short “ice-ray” is one of the classic studies that are used to express shape grammars, algorithmic design; maybe the roots of computational design at all. They are introduced analytically by Daniel Sheets Dye, and explained by George Stiny, based on parametric shape grammars approach. He explained shape rules and the abstract machine that produces these subdivisions. I was especially interested in Shape Grammars when I was a graduate student, also I coded a Shape Grammars […]

2012_02_03-iterations-th

In order to start creating recursive algorithms in Grasshopper, I finally managed to run Hoopsnake, a special component developed by Yiannis Chatzikonstantinou. This will help me develop parametric models that include loops. The fundamental experiment here shows a surface subdivision based on iterations. We should define a starting object or data, an operation to be repeated, and a limit that will tell Hoopsnake to stop looping. In this condition, this is the area of surface, put into a logic (larger than…). Here is the definition: [GHX: 0.8.0066 + HOOPSNAKE needed] […]