fractal

Based on this post, the problem of modeling tree-like fractal shapes is still a good question for early years of computational design education. Last time, I used Rhino’s macro to study these kind of fractals in an “impossibly” limited interface, but this time both vb.net and Anemone are introduced to students. First, using a Vb.net component that creates “the binary tree”: Here is the Grasshopper definition if you would like to see the simple vb.net loop in there: [GHX: 0.9.0076] (Don’t left click on the link, right click and “save the file” to your computer). Then, […]

Today’s design computing class was about fractals. In Rhino, writing macro statements are very easy to learn as it just mimics your behaviours in a sequential text. There are few syntactic rules that we should know. First, you should watch the command line carefully to understand the steps of your design process. Each command in Rhino require different inputs from the user. In macro, you may enter these values or tell macro to ask user by typing “_pause”. Blank spaces work as if you hit enter. Below is one of […]

This is the set of all Julia Sets (studied here). Here is a simple explanation without math. According to this website: The Mandelbrot set, named after Benoit Mandelbrot, is a fractal. Fractals are objects that display self-similarity at various scales. Magnifying a fractal reveals small-scale details similar to the large-scale characteristics. Although the Mandelbrot set is self-similar at magnified scales, the small scale details are not identical to the whole. In fact, the Mandelbrot set is infinitely complex. Yet the process of generating it is based on an extremely simple equation involving complex numbers. […]

I’m completely stuck with fractals nowadays, especially famous Mandelbrot and Julia sets. Here is my first definition which estimates Julia sets. There are lots of applets about this fractal calculations on the internet because the computational method is very simple, (and generally people love them because of this dilemma between simplicity, chaos and infinity). It is the iteration of a single function over and over again and placing points on the complex plane (not the cartesian plane). Here, it was my first recall of complex numbers, now I’m happy I’ll […]