Design Research » Synthesis »

This is a classical method of generating tree-like forms utilizing a simple command “Arc SED”. The idea is simple, as the command draws arcs using an input direction vector, so this could easily be implemented creating “smooth” composition of curves just by iteration. Actually, this has been a previous study, discussed before here, using Hoopsnake. Now, this time I’m implementing the same algorithm using Anemone and a couple of other changes.   Here is the Grasshopper definition (Anemone Components should be installed first): [GHX: 0.9.0076].

Based on this post, the problem of modeling tree-like fractal shapes is still a good question for early years of computational design education. Last time, I used Rhino’s macro to study these kind of fractals in an “impossibly” limited interface, but this time both vb.net and Anemone are introduced to students. First, using a Vb.net component that creates “the binary tree”: Here is the Grasshopper definition if you would like to see the simple vb.net loop in there: [GHX: 0.9.0076] (Don’t left click on the link, right click and “save the file” to your computer). Then, […]

This is the Grasshopper definition that generates tetrahedral helix (also called as Boerdijk-Coxeter helix), but in a funny way. This geometry is also a solution for tangent spheres. I generated the helix using Anemone components for recursion and gave it a little bit of responsiveness. I don’t know if it depends on the speed of your CPU but if it is slow enough, you’ll see the snake game of tetrahedral helix as it is driven by your input from a control knob. I’m not that interested in phone apps nowadays but […]

A mid-15th-century Ottoman recipe, mantı is filled with pounded lamb and crushed chickpeas, steamed, and served topped with yogurt mixed with crushed garlic and sprinkled with sumac. In modern Turkish cuisine, mantı is typically served topped with yogurt and garlic, and spiced with red pepper powder and melted butter, and with ground sumac and/or dried mint. Although there are many different variations of mantı in terms of shape and way of serving, the most praised type of mantı is known as Kayseri Mantısı, a special kind of mantı belong to Kayseri, […]

While testing Anemone loop components for Grasshopper, these curves have emerged. In fact, I was trying to develop the definition that mimics the well known branching script with “Arch SED” method (using tangent vectors for each arc and iterating the process in a random fashion so that the branches (arcs) join nicely). Anyway, this definition develops one branch from every previous one, while the position, rotation and the length are defined by three seperate graphs. If you play with these graphs, you’ll see the Anemone updates itself automatically, finally collecting the […]

I’ve been searching for a way to implement edge bundling on Grasshopper. It is an effective visualization technique to be used in connectivity diagrams. There are a couple of different approaches to this problem, and it is a nice way to analyse common paths within crowded graphs. I’ve found several entries in Grasshopper blog about this subject, but only implementing Kangaroo seemed to be a complete solution. My approach is of course not a scientific one, but after the application of Anemone it is now possible to model such iterative […]

Here is a test of the optical flow component of Firefly. You can check the Firefly add-on to Grasshopper here. As an ongoing research project, I’ve been searching for a suitable platform to study responsive geometric patterns. This initial study focuses on one particular effect of Firefly, the optical flow that outputs the direction vectors on a given webcam input. I developed traces of it by joining endpoints of these vectors together, creating strings. Then, recorded them to give better motion effects, adding color afterwards. Here is the Grasshopper definition […]

Bending is an easy operation in Rhino and Rhinoscript, however Grasshopper did not include that particular transformation (along with cage editing) yet. I tried to simulate the bending transformation by using native Grasshopper components. First, surface projections and pulls did not work at all, because I wanted to simulate a real bending effect without changing the surface area nor edge lengths. Then, Surface Morph component seemed to handle this issue, but it became an interesting challenge to put correct inputs to it. Finally I managed to implement the effect with […]

Force fields might be one of the most influential component sets of Grasshopper, thus it also becomes a de facto method like Voronoi subdivision. There are beautiful examples of this mathematical solution on the internet. This time I tried to see how it looks like when animated. Multiple spin forces merged together and the effect of field lines are extended for better visualization. Here is the Grasshopper definition: [GHX:0.9.0061] I know the video sucks. Here are some images of this effect;  

This was a month ago, I was searching for a way to work with random points and growing populations. Then this idea appeared accidentally. I wasn’t trying to mimic the behavior of biologic cells (in fact I’m in a serious doubt about biomimicry in general). The trick is to use timer + data recorder + a knob for the arbitrary user input. It starts to breed when you start the timer, but in order to change the evolution speed, just roll the knob!  Of course the knob is as precise […]

One at the Center is a multiple-axes vertex deformation based on a quadrangular hyperframe, designed by David Oleson at the studio of William Huff in 1964. Below, you see the original drawing and my Grasshopper animation based on a single point attractor, creating the “one” whereever it is. It was a pleasure to read and repeat this deformation, which is a nice exercise of data tree operations and also one of the first examples I see about point attractor algorithms in design education. Here is the Grasshopper file; if you are interested; [GHX: […]

Crossover is a single-axis, line-based deformation algorithm, constructed on a regular quadrangular hyperframe, designed by Richard Lane at the Basic Design studio of William Huff in 1963. It presents two apparently different deformation sequences linked together. Designer created a transition between the borders and inner cross-shapes gradually. This transition is visually smooth and interesting because of the component shift in the middle. It actually does not include polygonal components as seen at first sight, but works with a sequence of point and line orientations instead. This liberation from traditional understanding […]

Kündekari is an old woodworking technique, composed of interlocking parts without any glue or nail. It is primarily used in wooden doors and minbers inside Mosques. The interlocking system makes whole structure very durable. Unfortunately very little information could be found on the web about this beautiful technique. Below you see a typical example of Kündekari components and the resulting pattern composition. The subdivision part is out of the scope of this post (as it might be anything). The interesting part is the tongue-and-groove method, something like a puzzle. In […]

This is based on my failure of creating an optimum solution to planar polygonal subdivisions. There is a method called Tangent Plane Intersection (TPI), explained briefly here (sometimes similar algorithms are called “planar remeshing” and  “variational shape approximation”) which is effectively used in Trada pavilion (here). I tried to implement a similar method using only native Grasshopper components and no recursion, but it quickly became much more complicated than I thought. It was based on a simple idea that I can obtain the tangent plane of any point on a […]

Becoming very popular after the Beijing 2008 Olympics National Aquatics Centre’s facade (which is believed to be a voronoi subdivision, as an epic mistake), Weaire-Phelan is a solution (again said to be the “best” solution, which is not yet proven) of equal volumes with minimal surface area. This quickly became a cult object for contemporary architectural geometry (this is correct). Although it is believed to be a structural solution, I think for architects, catching the eye with “cute bubbles” seem to be the primary purpose of this structure. (images from […]

Trifoliolate is a single-axis, single-prototile hexagonal deformation designed by Glen Paris at the studio of William Huff in 1966. Dataflow diagram of the prototile is defined by first implementing a “manual” Euclidean construction of ruler and compass, then this applied to Grasshopper using a curve evaluation method (which is much optimal). This dependency graph reveals parametric potentials of the tiling. After that, a gradial manipulation is added to the tiling in order to create the original parquet deformation. Finally, further deformation opportunities are experimented on the tiling. Dataflow modeling is based […]

For the last 10 days I’ve been searching for a proper algorithm in representing surfaces using planar shapes. It is obvious that triangulation is an answer but there is an interesting research topic of planar remeshing using shapes other than quads, hexagons or any other regular polygons. Especially in computer graphics, such things refer to optimization of models to decrease the load of GPUs. In Grasshopper community, this has also been discussed and there is a great implementation at Trada pavilion by Ramboll Computational Design Team (link here). There are […]

I finally installed Firefly, it immediately powers Grasshopper up with beautifully smart components, even if you don’t have ardunio it is still very useful. If you want to give it a try, first you have to install a small tool free from www.reactivision.com in order to send data to Firefly. After that, you may download and install firefly from their website, www.fireflyexperiments.com. It was the real-time inputs, my first interest. I was very excited to get data from my laptop’s tiny webcam and process that data to deform a pattern. […]

It all started with the platonic passion on origami tessellations, not much of the origami, but the tessellation part, as I didn’t want to fold it physically, nor model them using a physical engine such as Kangaroo. That would also be very unnecessary (and yes, very boring) to simulate a folding effort on computer unless we lose our connection with the real world. Instead, I tried to look at a much abstract, silly and basic part of it; the creasing patterns. I found below tessellation named “waterbomb” by the beautiful […]

After the unsuccessful event of the “tumbler wall” here, I decided to return to the brick wall study, but this time starting from easy steps. You may remember this project from 5-axis masonry terminator of ETH, recent shows of RobArch and the Mullberry facade of SHOP architects. First, I studied the easiest possible way to place boxes on a surface; However, this was not a correct layout, but worst of all, some bricks un-realisticly collide!. I tried to develop complex brick layouts several times, then decided to go back to the […]