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This is done because I needed to represent relationships between different factors and layers of a design process. Although this method of “Chord Diagrams” is a very common technique in information design, it became very hard to find an effective tool for generating those diagrams quickly. There seem to be a solution called “Circos” but however even installing it to the computer became very boring for me. So I decided to make a Grasshopper definition that generates simple circular relationship diagrams. The resulting Grasshopper definition ([GHX: 0.9.0076]) seem to be a […]

Further studying iteration in Grasshopper, this time, inspired by Stiny’s “Ice-Ray”ish subdivisions with Aneome, instead of Hoopsnake in the previous work. Here is the Grasshopper definition (Requires Anemone components to be installed first): [GHX: 0.9.0076] Of course this is just an inspiration not the real scientific study Stiny has conducted (although I receive lots of emails about the previous Hoopsnake implementation; guys I’m not sure if this kind of algorithms are suitable for academic studies). Anyway this definition chooses random splitting directions of a surface for every iteration.

This is a useful tip both to solve some of the problems with custom surface subdivisions, and to explain the uses of parametric surface evaluations (the U,V,W thing) and the practical use of data lists. Step 1: Put your points inside 0,0,0 and 1,1,0 so that the resulting coordinates can easily be converted to U and Vs. In the example, we are putting some random points between 0,0 and 1,1 using Populate2d component. Step 2: Then make whatever you want with these points. For example we can create voronoi subdivision or delaunay […]

Image Sampler of Grasshopper saves life, if used responsibly. While explaining the component to this year’s ARCH362 students, I used this simple example that generates numbers from a beautiful picture of “metal foam” and uses it to generate lots of circles: Metal foams are lightweight but stong materials, that are typically produced by injecting gas into the liquid metal. Of course it becomes easier to teach something when you manage attract the attention of students. Here is the Grasshopper definition that shows the basic use of image sampler component: [GHX: 0.9.0076]

Finally I had a chance to test and understand what the “vector force” stands for in Grasshopper. It creates a continuous flow of force inside of the boundary, and is very useful if you want to create a field that is under continuous presence of a directional force such as gravity. The definition is pretty much simple: [GHX: 0.9.0076] [3DM: Rhino 5]

This year’s Parametric Modeling class starts with some of the very basic use of Grasshopper concepts. This definition is a practical start-up of using force fields in architectural design process. However it does not compute any physical phenomena (such as circulation of people, wind or anything else), but shows a simple way to tell Grasshopper about walls that push the field, and points that pull the field. I’ll post more of these kind of basics, hopefully along with some student works. Here is the Grasshopper definition [GHX: 0.9.0076] and the dummy Rhino file [3DM: […]

This quick project was a mapping of a tiling pattern inside of a multi-storey residential building’s hallways. While drawing the construction documents, it was necessary to apply of some coding here, as each floor had a different shape to be tiled. First, I’ve imported the geometric boundaries and the “middle curves” of the designed tiling pattern. The design was a simple one, yet to be handled carefully. After solving an example like this one, the Grasshopper definition generated all tiling solutions for the remaining hallways very quickly, saving lots of time. Sorry for the spaghetti code here, […]

This is a Cycloid-like family of curves, generated by its classical description: a rolling circle. In Grasshopper, we don’t need to roll the circle, but divide its path, utilizing data lists to simply rotate and evaluate it. It becomes more interesting when you play with the definition, chosing multiple evaluation points from the list of rotated circles. Here is an example: Here is the Grasshopper definition: [GHX: 0.9.0072]

Lokma is the name of a pastry made of fried dough soaked in sugar syrup or honey and cinnamon, typically shaped into a ring or ball. Unfortunately it is not the “Lokma” we’ll study here. In Turkish, there is another meaning of “Lokma” related with the history of eastern architecture. Lokma is the name of metal connectors used in railings, mostly inside of the openings of garden walls and old Mosque complexes. This system is often called “Lokma Railing” or “Lokma Iron”, while the connector of the railing is called […]

Points rock and roll within a predefined solution space. It should be based on a sound input of course but this is only a test to see if I can handle a timer and graph input at the same time.  I’ll modify this definition to actuate with sound.  The use of timer component gives a certain degree of randomness on the overall formation, while I start to be very discouraged with the exploratory limits of dataflow design. Here is the Grasshopper definition: [GHX:0.9.0061]. I’ve found a sound cable with small jacks on […]

In today’s drawing class, we taught methods of drawing basic transformations by hand. Mirror was one interesting subject of that. However, then I opened Grasshopper and Rhino to test the effects of curved mirror planes. Unfortunately I realized that there is already a curved mirror component in Grasshopper :( Here is the Grasshopper definition: [GHX: 0.9.0061] This might be one of the simpliest ways of introducing generative deformations for design geometry.

Here I’ve come across to a nice website about the short history of tilings and tessellations: http://gruze.org/tilings/. I’m especially interested in the role of Albrecht Dürer, who seem to pioneer some of the concepts of today’s emerging field of architectural geometry. In this website Kevin Jardine explains mathematical aspects of some of the ancient tilings in a very understandable format. Here is a phrase from his section about Dürer; Like Kepler, Dürer was fascinated with regular polygons and polyhedra, although more for their practical visual possibilities than as the basis for mathematical […]

Grasshopper still surprises me. This definition draws a spiral by using random component. It is obvious that the seed value of the random component has a relationship with an archimedian or a similar spiral. My intention was to create a definition to put a number of random points inside a circular area, not a rectangular one. While I grow the radius of a circle and get a t parameter evaluation from a random component using the same seed value with the radius, the resulting points started to create this spiral. […]

Instead of searching for an iterated and rule-based variety, this method captures instances of a spatial deformation by transforming the hyperframe. This liberates us from classical understanding of pattern deformations that are enframed within regular polygons, mostly rectangles or hexagons. Grasshopper has a built-in component to study such variety. Spatial Deform component gets vectors as inputs and transforms any given geometric object according to it. This website has also another nice use of this component. Here is the Grasshopper definition including the Islamic Pattern cluster from semi-regular tessellations, and spatial […]

Recently, I returned to old fashion RhinoScripts in order to recapture its idea and functionalities agin. After almost 10 years, this is my first experiment on creating a custom function that draws hexagonal grids. I tried to implement a fast process for it, however there could be much faster ones out there. This script focuses on the use of functions, variables, and object arrays. I’ll continue to make more of this simple exercises, and try to revisit some of the older studies in this blog pages that were done with […]

After becoming a ready-made component in Grasshopper, the Delaunay triangulation lost its popularity quickly. It used to be a nice problem of computational geometry for designers obsessed with scripting.  Last month, Benay reminded me the method of circle checking. She showed her Rhinoscript that creates circles from point triplets, and checks if a point is inside or not. Today I studied this in Grasshopper to see if I can handle the required point combinations quickly. However, my first attempt was terrible. Wikipedia has a clean-quick explanation of the term: In […]

New version of Grasshopper brings out two important features: Patch surfaces and date/time components. We used to implement a VB component to create simple clocks that measure temporal operations in Grasshopper. Parsing and executing MusicXML’s and related applications were based on that (here, here and here for example). Now I see there is a whole component tab, dealing with time-based issues in Grasshopper. I’m glad much more could be done in real-time now. Second and more important component was the special surface construction method of Rhinoceros, patch command is now […]

I’ve seen very beautiful examples of similar compositions made by using vector field components in Grasshopper. Just tried to make my own animate field lines to see how they float over force dynamics. In essence, these compositions could also be done using regular vector components but the field components make life much more easier by merging different forces together rather quickly. Here is my Grasshopper definition (be careful it may slow the computer down) [GHX: 0.9.0014] As you see below, it is a quite small definition that creates beautiful complexity. Although we […]

This was a couple of weeks ago, together with my six-year old son Mete, we decided to make a “ball” out of old memory cards. I was curious about a subdivision method, using only planar quadrilaterals to construct a sphere (named as Sixty Square Sphere. There are a couple of models on www. Of course look much better than mine :=). However my son was expecting a “ball” to play. Then, both of our expectations have been partially met, I think. You see the component configuration of squares that create triangular […]

This was a challenge; “is it possible to model a two-way parquet deformation using only native components, limited to 10 of them only”. Parquet deformations is a very interesting and pedagogical topic to teach some of the basics of contemporary parametric modeling. However it is an old technique; but looking at the architectural academia I think it is an underestimated one. The graph input tool creates the magic here. If you change the type of graph you’ll see a sort of it’s representation over a simple pattern deformation based on […]

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